Facial Oils – how to know when yours has gone ‘rancid’

Just as we often drink ‘corked’ wines, many of us are using oxidised oils that are not quite at their best. Here’s how to tell when your facial oil has gone rancid.

The beauty industry is in the throws of an oil addiction.

Facial oils are every beauty editor’s must-have for 2011, and, unfortunately, these products don’t come cheap!

A certified organic oil carries a high price tag as its comparatively high level of actives deliver better and faster results than most creams.

However oils can be very fragile ingredients, oxidising after minimal contact with air and sunlight.

As a result, many of us may be using facial oils that are no longer active, and so have far less skin benefits than we think.

For me, it helps to think of rancid oils in the same way we think of ‘corked’wines – which after oxidation lose their unique taste, aroma and ‘fine’ qualities.

The best way to ensure your oil is at its best is to keep an eye on the following characteristics:

Aroma

Rancid oils are best spotted by their aroma, which is usually musty and sour on the nose – a bit like old butter!

Colour

Oils can lose their depth of colour as they oxidise. A good Rosehip oil, for example, should be a vibrant orange – which indicates the presence of lots of skin-protecting carotenoids!

Fat profiles

Oils rich in polyunsaturated fats are incredibly popular facials oils, as they feel light and velvety on the skin. Mono-saturated fatty oils are less common as they are much richer, and so can feel heavy and ‘slicky’.

Polyunsaturated fats are, however, much more prone to oxidisation. So be sure to keep a close eye on oils such as Borage, Hemp and Safflower.

……

Make your beauty investment worthwhile by maximising the life of your oil.

Keep it in a cool place, out of direct sunlight (ideally in its original box), and avoid leaving unsealed for prolonged periods of time.

At Pai, we give you a little helping hand by adding 100% natural Vitamin E (from sunflower) to our Rosehip BioRegenerate oil.

This antioxidant prolongs the life of the oil, as well as protecting the skin from damaging environmental forces like UV rays and pollution.

We also endeavour to use CO2 extracts over Cold Pressed extracts when it comes to particularly fragile oils such as Rosehip.

As no oxygen is present during the extraction processs, CO2 extracts remain at their best for 18 months, compared to the 3-6 months lifespan of Cold Pressed extracts.

  • http://twitter.com/fbnns Farid Bennis

    Is the Rosehip oil that Pai uses cold pressed or CO2 extracted?

  • paiskincare

    Hi Farid,

    Pai only uses CO2 extracted Rosehip oil.

    Thanks.

  • Anonymous

    Pai uses Rosehip Fruit Extract and Rosehip Seed Oil – both are CO2 extracted.

  • Mehak

    i recently purchased 100% rosehip oil and its an orangish color with an unpleasent smell that reminds me of sesame oil. is it ok to keep it in my room in a dark container? i keep the heater on 50% of the time and should i dilute it with vitamin e or leave it as is?

  • Mehak

    i recently purchased 100% rosehip oil and its an orangish color with an unpleasent smell that reminds me of sesame oil. is it ok to keep it in my room in a dark container? i keep the heater on 50% of the time and should i dilute it with vitamin e or leave it as is?